Quick Answer: How Many Shares Does PepsiCo Have?

Common Stock (PEP) Institutional Holdings | Nasdaq.

Ownership Summary.

LabelValue
Total Shares Outstanding (millions)1,388
Total Value of Holdings (millions)$130,611

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How many shareholders does PepsiCo have?

Top 10 Owners of PepsiCo Inc

StockholderStakeShares owned
The Vanguard Group, Inc.8.25%114,672,157
BlackRock Fund Advisors5.22%72,518,476
SSgA Funds Management, Inc.4.74%65,779,456
Wellington Management Co. LLP1.78%24,775,101

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How many shares does Coca Cola have?

Stock Splits and Dividends

Coca-Cola’s stock has split 11 times since its IPO. By splitting the stock, Coca-Cola has consistently kept its share price low enough to attract all levels of investors. An investor who purchased a single share of Coca-Cola in 1919 would now hold 9,216 shares.

Does PepsiCo pay dividends?

Pepsi Dividend Policy Analysis

13, 2019, the company declared a quarterly dividend of 0.9275 cents per share, an increase of 15.2% from the previous year. That’s a yield of about 3.03%. Pepsi has paid dividends in every consecutive quarter since 1965.

What type of stock is Pepsi?

PEP (Common Stock)
ExchangeNASDAQ GS (US Dollar)
Price$137.55
Change(%)+1.91 (+1.41%)
Volume4,866,512

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Who currently owns Pepsi?

PepsiCo, Inc., American food and beverage company that is one of the largest in the world, with products available in more than 200 countries. It took its name in 1965 when the Pepsi-Cola Company merged with Frito-Lay, Inc. The company’s headquarters are in Purchase, New York. PepsiCo, Inc.

Who owns the most PepsiCo stock?

Top 10 Owners of PepsiCo Inc

StockholderStakeShares owned
The Vanguard Group, Inc.8.25%114,672,157
BlackRock Fund Advisors5.22%72,518,476
SSgA Funds Management, Inc.4.74%65,779,456
Wellington Management Co. LLP1.78%24,775,101

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Is Coca Cola a good stock?

In this environment, marked by fears of a potential global recession and a seemingly endless string of market downdrafts, it’s a great day to buy a safe-haven stock with solid financials, a lucrative dividend yield, and great growth potential — a stock like global beverage behemoth Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO).

Why is Pepsi stock higher than Coke?

Why You Should Buy Pepsi Instead of Coca-Cola Stock. Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) stock is more expensive than PepsiCo (NASDAQ:PEP) in most value metrics for the two companies’ valuations in relation to their sales, earnings and cash flow. For example, KO trades at 24 times its forward price-to-earnings ratio.

What is the best stock to invest in right now?

Best stocks as of April 2020

SymbolCompany namePrice performance (52 weeks)
LRCXLam Research Corp34.07%
AAPLApple Inc33.87%
BIIBBiogen Inc33.84%
MSFTMicrosoft Corp33.72%

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Should I buy Coke or Pepsi stock?

Why You Should Buy Pepsi Instead of Coca-Cola Stock. Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) stock is more expensive than PepsiCo (NASDAQ:PEP) in most value metrics for the two companies’ valuations in relation to their sales, earnings and cash flow. For example, KO trades at 24 times its forward price-to-earnings ratio.

Is Pepsi a good stock to buy?

PepsiCo will never be a big growth stock, but for dividend investors, it looks like a solid buy. It offers a reliable, slowly growing dividend, growth opportunities in snacks and international markets, and a recession-resistant base of well-known consumer staples brands.

Which stock pays highest dividend?

List of 25 high-dividend stocks

SymbolCompany nameDividend yield
BMOBank of Montreal6.23%
BCEBCE Inc.5.97%
IBMInternational Business Machines Corp5.89%
WHRWhirlpool Corp5.88%

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Is Pepsi stock a buy or sell?

Style Scorecard

Zacks RankDefinitionAnnualized Return
1Strong Buy24.13%
2Buy17.51%
3Hold9.18%
4Sell4.92%

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What do Pepsi own?

Strong brand portfolio

PepsiCo owns several popular brands, including Pepsi, Lays, Doritos, Mountain Dew, Cheetos, Mirinda, Ruffles, Aquafina, Quaker, and Tropicana.

Why is Pepsi stock down?

While PepsiCo’s stock has declined due to the Coronavirus/Oil Price War crisis, going by trends seen during the 2008 slowdown, it’s likely that it could bounce back strongly but potentially underperform the broader market (due to rebounding less as it dropped less) as the crisis winds down.